Archive for the ‘Economic Growth’ Category

The strong dollar, its impact on growth, and the TPP

March 27th, 2015

When it comes to the debate over whether the Trans Pacific Partnership trade agreement should include rules against managing currency, the recent, sharp rise in the value of the dollar offers a little something for everyone. For TPP supporters who oppose a currency chapter—i.e., explicit actions to be taken against signatories who push down the value… Read more

Ideas to boost wage growth from the Resolution Foundation

March 26th, 2015

I’ve often touted the UK think tank, the Resolution Foundation, for their timely, accessible, and smart policy work on all the key issues–macro, micro, budgets. But their work has been particularly important in raising the issue of wage stagnation in the UK–basically, the Brits caught our wage disease–median and low-wage stagnation, growing dispersion–later than us, but… Read more

The Fed lowered its long-term unemployment rate…and a salient point re the R’s budgets

March 19th, 2015

Details at PostEverything. Everyone’s wound up about precisely when liftoff will occur (when the Fed will first raise interest rates after about six years at about zero) but I think the big story is that the Fed lowered their “natural rate,” the unemployment rate consistent with stable inflation. It’s a confusing time for Fed macromanagement… Read more

Middle Class Economics: Josh Barro nails some critical points

February 26th, 2015

Josh Barro does an excellent job describing many of the key points about the challenges of crafting what politicians are calling “middle-class economics.” As I see it, they’re talking about policies that reconnect overall economic growth and the prosperity of the middle class. Though median household incomes have been rising in recent years, as best… Read more

Systematically over-predicting interest rates…why and what does that portend?

February 23rd, 2015

Over at the Upshot, but here’s the key figure which tells a heckuva story. Typically, forecasts that continuously err on one side versus more random error suggest there’s a structural change in the economy that’s left out of the model.   Plus, you gotta love the Queen Elizabeth anecdote and picture. Not to be rude,… Read more